Neon Project Bags

Having bought a second-hand copy of “The Harmony Guide to Machine Knitting Stitches”,  I was intrigued by one of it’s star-shaped patterns.  Unfortunately, the pattern was laid out for a 50-row punchcard.  So, using my knitter’s graph paper from Rowan Morrison Books, I adapted the pattern for my 60-row punchcards.

IMG_0417  IMG_0277

After I had knitted up some sample swatches using the new punchcard, I designed a new fabric bag, one large enough to take a medium-sized knitting or crochet project.  I decided to complement this with a long tool case that could take DPNs.  Once these were fine-tuned, I decided to make a collection of neon coloured bags, with a grey contrast colour.  Trips to the Knit Rennie woollen mill in Mintlaw, Aberdeenshire and to the fabric mill,  Scottish Linen in Fife were then needed to stock up on the right colours and fabrics.

IMG_3726    IMG_3729

   
Once I had machine knitted the fabric, I  cut out and sewed the medium-sized project bags and long tool or pencil cases using complimentary lining fabrics.  These are now for sale in my Woolly Originals E-Shop. Next up, my Granite Star designs!

IMG_3744    IMG_0347

  
IMG_0369

 

 

 

 

Summer Landscape Bags

In November, I visited the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and their amazing exhibition of Modern Scottish Women.  I loved one of the paintings in particular which was by the artist, Joan Eardley.  Luckily, in the Gallery bookshop, they had a biography of her life and paintings (Pearson, 2007).  Joan Eardley (1921-1963) was born in England, and trained as an artist in London and at the Glasgow School of Art.  Her work encompassed both urban and rural Scotland.  Her incredible paintings inspired me to think about a new design for my knitted bags.  I started first with my colourwork book, then progressed to my knitting graph paper.

I started machine knitting the background fabric, incorporating more than six colours into the design using 2/11 supersoft lambswool from Knit Rennie in Mintlaw, Aberdeenshire.  After, the fabric had been washed, blocked and dried, I crocheted woollen chains into the face of the fabric, to represent the foliage in the summer landscape picture, whilst recycled buttons became flower heads and the pale morning sun.

The bags were sewn with a complimentary back in a simple repeat pattern, and then lined with beautiful linen fabric purchased from Scottish Linen in Fife.

Reference:

Pearson, F (2007) Joan Eardley, National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh

E-Shop

At last I have got my E-Shop up and running!  I can now sell my unique project bags online. The small versions of these bags are currently available on the shop but I’ll be adding other products over the next few weeks.  A link to my shop can be found in the Menu bar at the top of the page, on the sidebar (if viewing on a desktop computer), or at the foot of the page (if viewing on a mobile device) in “Links”.

image image image image